Saturday, March 26, 2011

organics can feed the world...stop wasting food!

This post isn't going to be quoting any studies that argue the point that organic agriculture can or cannot feed the world. But, it is going to point out one thing and that is the absolute disgrace that is our modern society's wasteful attitude towards food. Read this...http://www.good.is/post/the-u-s-wastes-40-percent-of-all-food-produced-per-year-how-about-we-stop-doing-that/

Also, have a look at Bruce's post if you want to see some serious potential waste. If Bruce wasn't there, all that food would go to the landfill!

Organic agriculture produces roughly the same amount of food as conventional does. There are many studies that are sponsored by Monsanto that would refute that I am sure but I chose to believe more reputable studies by people who actually want to know the truth instead of corporations that want to produce their own truth. But let's say, just for argument's sake, that it doesn't produce as much food. How about we set up a North American society that doesn't waste up to 40% of its food. I would suspect that if we could capture even half of that waste, we'd be doing just fine with whatever organics can produce and we'd have the added benefit of reducing all the chemical pollution that is jeopardizing our health and welfare.

Why I believe that small-scale, organic agriculture can indeed feed the world...
An added story that relates to sustainable agriculture from a new friend and market customer Nancy...On March 8, Dr. Olivier De Schutter, the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the right to food,released a reportarguing that the use of small-scale, diverse farming methods, which he calls "agroecology," can double agricultural production in poverty-stricken areas, increase the economic prospects of the inhabitants, and improve their local environment.  

2 comments:

  1. Wow, I love the term "agroecology." I think it will become more a key concept in the next few years.

    Ugh, food waste...I think we don't know the half of it. I get distressed at my own fridge sometimes but imagine all the other levels that waste can happen at. A friend of mine who adjusts inventory at local supermarkets went to drop some garbage in the dumpster outside the store where she was working last spring; the bottom of the dumpster was filled with wrapped cuts of meat about a quarter of the way up. They "looked" perfectly fine. Even if they can't feed people, surely they could feed animals?

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  2. I tried to convince a very friendly man at our Sobeys to let me have their spoiled produce for my compost. He totally agrees (maybe because he is from India) but he is not allowed... it's another case of litigation phobia.

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